Horticulture Uganda Page

moderated by Sylvia Natukunda Mwesigwa

This group serves for exchange and learning on Horticulture in Uganda, Materials available are open to all. 

Uganda has fairly well distributed rainfall and moderate climate and is capable of producing most of the tropical and sub-tropical fruits and vegetables, herbs and spices, or even temperate fruits and vegetables in the higher altitude areas. The industry relies heavily on imported seeds for vegetables, such as okra and hot pepper. Ugandan fruits in particular are reported to be sweeter and less acidic than those produced in other countries in the region; however, only a small percentage is of export quality. Small scale rain-fed farms of smallholder farmers dominate the sub-sector.

As a network organization, AgriProFocus Uganda members/stakeholders are committed to unite and complement each other in a shared goal: promoting farmer entrepreneurship contributing to increased food security, value chain development and poverty reduction. In this, with over 4000 registered stakeholders online, AgriProFocus Uganda has positioned itself as a key partner of horticulture stakeholders given its continual involvement in the fruit sub-sector and now the horticulture sub-sector.

Objectives

1. To lobby and advocate for policy enforcement and changes in the horticulture sub-sector

2. To coordinate stakeholders in the horticulture sub-sector to strengthen the sub-sector

3. To be the center of information for the horticulture sub-sector

4. To increase the visibility of the platform online and offline

5. To seek and promote innovations and technologies that can be adopted in the horticulture sub-sector

Current stakeholders

Current stakeholders in the Horticulture Multi-stakeholder Platform include; SNV, VECO East Africa, Uganda National Farmers’ Federation (UNFFE), Uganda Cooperative Alliance (UCA), aBi Trust, Nabagereka Development Foundation, IFDC, Solidaridad Network, Zuri Model Farm, Afribanana Products Ltd, Pelum, RUCID, NARL, UGOCert.


Posted By in Horticulture Uganda Page
Posted 2 weeks 3 days ago

Uganda Horticulture MSP Meeting outcomes

The Horticulture Multi stakeholder platform Met and discussed important issues affecting the horticulture sector in Uganda. The following is what was agreed upon;

  I. Registration and Launch of the Horticulture MSP

Members proposed to have the platform registered as a network association so it can be recognised as a legal entity; to enable the platform mobilize financial resources through partnerships with member organisations. The launch of the MSP will proceed after the completion of the registration process.

   II. Increase Visibility of the Platform.

Members proposed that there is need to mobilise more stakeholders to join the platform using the diamond approach of Government, private sector, research and Knowledge institutions to be interested to join the platform. The working committee was entrusted to identify potential stakeholders.

  III. Capacity Building

Following the Europ

... Read more

Posted By in Horticulture Uganda Page
Posted 5 months 5 days ago

Call for proposals 

Competitiveness & enterprise development project: deadline 30th November 2016

Herewith attached is a call for proposals for the matching grant facility offered by Private Sector Foundation Uganda (PSFU).  Sectors of interest are horticulture, tourism, coffee, grains, pulses, edible oils, fisheries and ICT

See Fourth call proposals attached for details

Good luck!

Posted By in Horticulture Uganda Page
Posted 5 months 3 weeks ago

SPACING OF PASSION FRUITS

Many farmers have been asking about the appropriate spacing for the small purple passion fruits. Today lets share about it.

Small purple passion fruits (local purple) require an open space with limited shades to help them get enough sunshine. When a passion fruit farmer is planting, its important to consider appropriate spacing as it has a bearing on the cost and life span of the orchard.

The most appropriate spacing is 9 x 9 ft or 10 x 10 ft.

Importance.

1. Wide spacing Eases vine growth on the trellis thus giving you more flowers and fruits.

2. Prevents early orchard suffocation leading to delayed pruning.

3. Promotes airation of the orchard which in turn reduces disease outbreaks.

4. Delayed pruning leads to saving on the side of the farmer. Pruning is costly and therefore the later you it, the better.

5. Easy control of pests and diseases. With wide spacing and limited growth, spraying is easy and each part of the plant is reached thus keeping away pests.

6. Less su

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oct
05

TRADE & INVESTMENT MATCHMAKING EVENT

Event posted by in AgriProFocus Uganda
  05 October 2016 to 06 October 2016 - All Day Event
  Kampala

Promoting Agribusiness Investment, Networking and Trade (PAINT)

PAINT aims to bring together local, regional and international agribusinesses to build long term sustainable business relationships.

The initiative shall support the growth of the agribusiness sector by linking investable and profitable agribusinesses in the sectors of horticulture, coffee, oilseed, dairy & livestock to financing , technology, knowledge and markets.

Specific objective

1. To connect prequalified agribusinesses to financing

2. To link buyers to suppliers of inputs (commodities, equipment and services)

3. To link investors to investable businesses and opportunities

4. To facilitate transfer of knowledge and technology among businesses

Activities

We are currently receiving application from interested businesses in the sectors mentioned above who wish to participate in the trade and investment matchmaking event that will take place on 5th & 6th Octobe

... Read more



Posted By in Horticulture Uganda Page
Posted 8 months 3 weeks ago

Fighting Fruit Flies

A new series of 6 farmer training videos on fruit fly management is freely downloadable, also in 3gp format for mobile phone viewing, from  Access Agriculture

Learn how fruit flies live, how to tell if they are present, and how to control them follow link: Integrated approach against fruit flies

One of the best practices to control fruit flies is to destroy all fallen fruit in your orchard: collecting fallen fruit against fruit flies

Male fruit flies are attracted by the smell of female fruit flies. This odour is called a pheromone:Mass trapping of fruit flies

There are different types of fruit flies, but all are attracted to food baits that are rich in proteins and sugar

killing fruits flies with food baits