Posted By in Gender in Value Chains Uganda
Posted 5 December 2018 at 08:19

Gender, agriculture and climate change:

Climate change is a global threat to sustainable development and food security. In developing countries, dependence on rain-fed agriculture and natural resources as the main livelihood strategy, is making farmers, especially women, extremely vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Climate-smart agriculture (CSA) is an approach to ensure food security, increase productivity and incomes, build resilience to climate change, and reduce emissions from agricultural systems. Gender, however, is a critical dimension of CSA that cannot be ignored as gender inequalities can hinder the transition to CSA for millions of farmers.

To see transformative changes in agriculture and food systems in a changing climate, all stakeholders, including scientists, governments and development practitioners, must tackle gender issues. By mainstreaming gender into CSA, identifying the constraints and needs of women and men farmers, and providing opportunities to accelerate CSA adoption, women will have increased access to information, knowledge, and the resources needed to adapt to climate change.

Gender equality and social inclusion (including youth) cut across all thematic areas (flagships) of CCAFS’ research – from climate-smart agriculture, to climate risk management, low emissions development, and policies and institutions. Gender and social analysis is critical to achieving desired development outcomes of increased production, improved outcomes for poverty alleviation, increased well-being for all, and a fairer distribution of burdens and benefits in agriculture among women and men.

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