agroecology

Posted By in Ethiopia Agroecology Platform
Posted 19 December 2017 at 08:55

Tropical Permaculture Guidebook

Now updated and available for download here.

A practical reference guide for implementing permaculture techniques that are specific to tropical climates. It is a gift of ‘permaculture knowledge’ from Timor Leste to the region.

A complete permaculture guide for anyone to read and apply. Enables sustainable food production and food sovereignty. Facilitates climate resilience, and environmental regeneration. Empowers communities and secures livelihoods. 18 easy to follow chapters, 900+ pages with over 2000 detailed illustrations. More chapters will be added as they become available.


The book chapters are divided into three volumes with the following sub-themes:

  • Volume 1: Permaculture and people
  • Volume 2: House and garden
  • Volume 3: Regenerative agriculture

From WithOnePlanet Climate Change Education.


Alazar Michael Thanks, but where to find ?

4 weeks 17 hours ago

Sarah Assefa You have to click the link where the word"Here" is in the first line of the article, or go to this page: http://withoneplanet.org.au/permaculture-guidebook/

4 weeks 16 hours ago

Posted By in AgriProFocus Ethiopia
Posted 14 December 2017 at 01:31

Field Report: Agricultural Mechanization at Melkasa Agricultural Research Center & Menjar Agroforestry and Rainwater Harvest

This learning trip was hosted by the partners of the Agroecology Platform - AgriProFocus, Canadian Food Grains Bank and AKLDP with the support of GIZ AMTP, and collaboration from Adama Science and Technology University, Farmers and local government authorities of Menjar, and Melkasa Agricultural Research Center. Please find full report attached.


Posted By in AgriProFocus Ethiopia
Posted 13 December 2017 at 03:52

Open call for examples of ‘Innovation for agroecology’

2nd International Symposium on Agroecology

Dear partners and colleagues,

As you may know, FAO is organizing the 2nd International Symposium on Agroecology (more information here: https://goo.gl/ic7PTf).

Agroecology depends on the co-creation of local capacities and knowledge –often building on traditional knowledge- that works with complex systems under changing environmental, social and economic conditions. That requires shifting the emphasis from traditional technology transfer approaches to identifying, supporting and strengthening the institutions and processes needed to enable innovative ways of knowledge creation and sharing.

As part of the Symposium, FAO will co-organize and host a ‘Market place on innovation for agroecology’. With the present call, we would like to highlight innovative example actions or processes from a wide range of actors involved in agriculture and food systems in their diversity

... Read more

Posted By in Ethiopia Agroecology Platform
Posted 12 December 2017 at 07:07

A new book is available online:

Everyday experts: how people’s knowledge can transform the food system

It explains how knowledge built up through firsthand experience can help solve the crisis in the food system. It brings together 57 activists, farmers, practitioners, researchers and community organisers from around the world to take a critical look at attempts to improve the dialogue between people whose knowledge has been marginalised in the past and others who are recognised as professional experts.

Using a combination of stories, poems, photos and videos, the contributors demonstrate how people’s knowledge can transform the food system towards greater social and environmental justice. Many of the chapters also explore the challenges of using action and participatory approaches to research. Chapter eight discusses a participatory approach to promoting agroecology.

You can download the entire book (14 MB) or single chapters (listed in attached flyer) on the website: http://www.coven

... Read more

Posted By in AgriProFocus Netherlands
Posted 20 November 2017 at 09:26

Strategies for feeding the world more sustainably with organic agriculture

Scientific article & YouTube video

Organic agriculture is proposed as a promising approach to achieving sustainable food systems, but its feasibility is also contested. In this video, FiBL researcher Adrian Müller presents a food systems model that addresses agronomic characteristics of organic agriculture to analyse the role that organic agriculture could play in sustainable food systems. The results show, that a 100% conversion to organic agriculture needs more land than conventional agriculture but reduces Nitrogen-surplus and pesticide use. However, in combination with reductions of food wastage and food-competing feed from arable land, with correspondingly reduced production and consumption of animal products, land use under organic agriculture remains below the reference scenario. Other indicators such as greenhouse gas emissions also improve. Besides focusing on production, sustainable food systems need to

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Paul Marivate I like the discussion 

2 months 2 days ago

NIYONKURU Albert Yes, Organic agriculture is proposed as a promising approach to achieving sustainable food systems. Thanks

2 months 2 days ago

Thacien MUNYAMAHAME That's a nice article @Nicole!Thank you very much for sharing with us!

2 months 1 day ago

GEOFREY MTEMBELI that's   wonderfull.

3 weeks 22 hours ago

nov
22

Workshop:Compost Theory and Practice

Event posted by in AgriProFocus Ethiopia
  22 November 2017 - 08:30 to 23 November 2017 - 16:30
  Addis Ababa University EIABC, Lideta, Addis Ababa

Learn all about compost from experts and practitioners. Practically make a compost heap and build your own vermicompost box!  Organized by AAU EIABC Landscape Architecture Department in collaboration with Boku and Hamburg Consult. To register to participate, please fill online registration form available via this LINK developed by AgriProFocus.

UPDATE: The PowerPoint Presentations from this workshop are now available upon request by emailing sassefa@agriprofocus.com.



nov
25

Organic Farmers Market

Event posted by in Ethiopia Agroecology Platform
  25 November 2017, 09:00-14:00
  In the compound of MIGBARE SENAY GENERAL HOSPITAL, near Aduwa Bridge, AA, Ethiopia

Organic tomatoes, honey, coffee, oils, cheese, fruits and more! This is the second gathering of this new farmers' market organized by Ecopia. Among sellers are Slow Food and AgriProFocus Member Alem of Nutri-Dense with her sprouted cereals. Flyer attached.




Posted By in Sustainable Agriculture
Posted 8 November 2017 at 09:03

Call For Successful Experiences in Scaling-up Agroecology

FAO calls for cases - deadline 13 November

As one of the planned agenda items of the 2nd International Symposium on Agroecology: Scaling Up agroecology to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), FAO will select and showcase successful experiences in agroecology in action that can be scaled up and out. We will select 12 cases to be presented by speakers during a session of the International Symposium (10min each presentation). The selection of cases will be based on the following criteria:

· Contribution made to scale-up agroecology

· Potential to be replicated and further scaled-up/out

· Addresses each of the three pillars of sustainability (social environmental and economic)

· Regional balance will be ensured

· For each region, case studies involving governmental and non-governmental initiatives will be included

· All the cases need to be based either on policy or practices

... Read more

Posted By in AgriProFocus Ethiopia
Posted 3 November 2017 at 01:07

Agroforestry and Rain Water Harvesting Field Visit at Bolo Silase Kebele (Arerti), Menjar

27th October 2017

The Agroecology platform of AgriProFocus Ethiopia hosted a field visit to Menjar area Arerti woreda, BoloSilase kebele.

Bolo Silase kebele of Arerti woreda, has a soil type of silty loam, temperature ranging between 18-33°C. The livelihood of the area is mixed agriculture and livestock Like other parts of the country it is also characterized by rain fed agriculture the cash crops are teff, wheat, chick pea, barley, fruits and onion.

Now-a-day’s climate change is a boundless problem in every corner of the world so the farmers needed to practice soil and water conservation techniques widely. In order to capable of being resilient to environmental shocks they built water harvesting pond and practicing other NRM techniques. In that kebele earthen ponds were built at family level having a capacity of 84 – 129 cubic meter of water and at community level having a capacity of 1,

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Sarah Assefa ASTU seeks support to further research the impact of algae on water conservation in water holding ponds. All farmers in the area are using this algae, and the water beneath it remains cool in temperature. It is unsure how much moisture is saved by the algae presence, and how much water is lost by transpiration through the bodies of the algae. Please contact us if you would like to assist ASTU to further this research! (Sassefa@agriprofocus.com)

2 months 2 weeks ago

Sarah Assefa Please find full field report in post from Dec. 14: https://agriprofocus.com/post/5a327d1c26b72a09161f1b21

1 month 5 days ago

Posted By in AgriProFocus Ethiopia
Posted 3 November 2017 at 12:17

Dr. Fentahun on Fall Armyworm (FAW) Control in Ethiopia

Agriculture Knowledge Learning Documentation and Policy (AKLDP) Project

26th October 2017

For the Agroecology platform's new Agroecological Weed and Pest Management Working Group, Dr Fentahun from AKLDP presented the overall situation related to the new pest, Fall Army worm (FAW). He also shared a technical brief focusing on the characteristics of the pest, agro-climatic conditions and agro-ecological consistency affecting FAW, and management options and on suggested action points for the FAW in the context of Ethiopia.

Fall Army worm has existed for more than 150 years in Central, Eastern and South America. It is able to attack up to 186 crop species from a wide variety of families. It reproduces quickly and is able to travel far and fast, adult moths flying up to 100 km/day. It was identified in Ethiopia in February 2017, and due to its quick reproductive nature and favorable environmental conditions, it has now present in 8

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Sarah Assefa With regard to Conservation Agriculture, the research has conflicting findings about maintaining crop residues on the soil in addressing FAW: some advocate clean cultivation as a means of controlling the pest, however other publications have findings that do not support this. There is no conclusive finding.

2 months 2 weeks ago

Posted By in AgriProFocus Ethiopia
Posted 3 November 2017 at 12:01

Dr. Georg Dichert on the GIZ Framework for Climate Smart Agriculture (CSA)

26th October 2017

For the agroecology platform facilitated by AgriProFocus, Dr George Deichert from GIZ SLM made a presentation differentiating between Agroecology, CSA, Sustainable Agriculture, Organic Agriculture, Modern Agriculture and other forms of agriculture. He focused on CSA and outlined a framework for rating the degree to which activities can be considered climate smart.

CSA (like agroecology) is defined as more based on principles rather than directive recommendations as per Conventional and Modern Agriculture. The three CSA pillars are adaptation, mitigation and production. GIZ developed guidelines to assess the degree of climate smartness of activities by scoring a range of economic and environmental parameters. It is important to note that sometimes production is weighted so heavily that activities termed as “climate smart” may not actually have true adaptation aspect: increase in productivity (a

... Read more

Posted By in AgriProFocus Uganda
Posted 17 October 2017 at 07:23

News on Fall Army Worm

Read about push and pull plants to protect maize crops in the latest issue of African Farming.

As a sideline, they mention the use of sand to protect the young plant (funnel of leaves stage) from the FAW caterpillar. Who has more about this?


3 pages in this link:

https://issuu.com/alaincharles/docs/af_sep_oct_2017/20?e=4518041/42766464

Thacien MUNYAMAHAME Good job at Wim Goris, FAW is a big a challenge in maize production especially in East Africa. Now in Rwanda we are applying strong pesticides for controlling  FAWs but this preventive method kills all important natural enemies of insects in the fields. Therefore, PUSH&PULL method like using sand is a good approach to handle FAW disease in maize farms.

3 months 1 week ago

Wim Goris hi Thacien. thanks for sharing. please read the source  again.  Push and pull is about plants that repel or attract FAW away from the maize. The sand  in the young maize plants is another method.  Which Rwanda institutions and companies are involved in the battle against FAW? 

3 months 1 week ago

Thacien MUNYAMAHAME @Wim, you are right 100%. Thanks for supporting farmers!

3 months 1 week ago

Sarah Assefa Institute for Sustainable Development (ISD) has a lot of experience with push and pull in Ethiopia (and they have worked closely with ICIPE in Kenya on this). More here: https://agriprofocus.com/upload/Push-Pull_Technology_in_Ethiopia_Progress_and_Challenges1448614788.pdf and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NfyHa8e9hDI

2 months 3 weeks ago

Posted By in AgriProFocus Uganda
Posted 5 October 2017 at 04:50

Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) boss routes for Agroecosystems

The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) boss Mr. Igbokwe noted that global agricultural production is already being affected by changes in rainfall and temperature thus compromising food security.   “Many studies reveal that small farmers who follow agro-ecological practices cope with, and even prepare for climate change. Through managing on-farm biodiversity and soil cover and by enhancing soil organic matter, agro ecological farmers minimize crop failure under extreme climatic events,” he explained. 

Igbokwe noted that global agricultural production is already being affected by changes in rainfall and temperature thus compromising food security. 

 Full article here


Posted By in Ethiopia AgroEcology Platform
Posted 21 September 2017 at 12:40

COTTON WITHOUT HIGHLY HAZARDOUS PESTICIDES

Ethiopian experiences in growing high quality, high yield cotton using Agroecological methods

Background

Cotton is grown by smallholder farmers and large commercial farms in Ethiopia’s southern Rift Valley. Production can be challenging as the crop is prone to attack by a wide variety of pests, especially African Boll-worm Helicoverpa Armigera and sucking pests like White flies and Aphids. Farmers have to manage these and other pests effectively to gain decent yield, profit from their cotton and most have relied on the use of synthetic pesticides for pest control. Cotton farms mainly use older Organophosphate, Organochlorine and Carbamate insecticides, many of which qualify as Highly Hazardous Pesticides (HHPs), including Endosulfan, Malathion, Carbosulfan, Dimethoate and Dicofol (Table 1). Endosulfan is a Persistent Organic Pollutant (POP) listed for global banning under the Stockholm Convention since 2011, yet remains widely in use by

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Posted By in AgriProFocus Ethiopia
Posted 14 September 2017 at 09:30

Bartering Tree-Preneurs

Value addition can come in many forms.  In South Africa, with the Wildlands Trees for Life Programme, community-based tree seedling growers (many of whom are youth) trade their seedlings for food, water tanks, and small business loans. Read more here.

Attention: "Surviving tree project" team from the AgriProFocus Youth in Agribusiness Network, that has been studying tree seedling value chains in Ethiopia - this may be of interest!


Posted By in Ethiopia AgroEcology Platform
Posted 8 August 2017 at 02:05

Agroecology for Food Security and

Nutrition

Proceedings of the FAO International SymposiuM

Our global food system is at a crossroads. Agriculture must meet the challenges of hunger and malnutrition – against a backdrop of population growth, increased pressure on natural resources including soils and water, the loss of biodiversity, and the uncertainties associated with climate change. While past efforts focused on boosting agricultural output to produce more food, today’s challenges – including climate change – demand a new approach. We need to shift to more sustainable food systems – food systems that produce more, with less environmental cost. In many countries agriculture has been seen as an enemy of the environment, but there is increasing recognition that a regenerative, productive farming sector can provide environmental benefits while creating rural employment and sustaining livelihoods. Agroecology offers the possibility of win-win solutions. By building syn

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Posted By in Ethiopia AgroEcology Platform
Posted 31 July 2017 at 12:07

Can agroecology feed the world and save the planet?

As agricultural production across the world is increasingly threatened by climate change and overpopulation, some farmers are exploring radical alternatives like agroecology – which might just be the answer to global hunger

By Henrietta Moore (Director of UCL Institute for Global Prosperity)  

You wouldn’t necessarily know it, but right now Africa is facing a food crisis. With Brexit, global terror attacks, the war in Syria and the seemingly endless string of sporting fixtures vying for our collective attention in 2016 so far, the fact that up to 50 million people across east and Southern Africa are at risk of hunger seems to have largely escaped mention.

The continent has been wracked by drought following one of the strongest ever El Niños. And while a natural phenomenon is the immediate cause, however, Africa’s food security has been undermined over recent decades by the rise of mono cropping – the planting of

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Posted By in Ethiopia AgroEcology Platform
Posted 27 July 2017 at 01:41

Better and Different!

Transforming Food Systems through Agroecology

Agroecology is not merely an agricultural approach that reduces the need for pesticides and fertilisers, recycles plant remains and harnesses biological processes to grow food. Rather, agroecology emphasises a particular perspective vis-à-vis our relationship to nature. Around this perspective, a social movement is growing, which encourages peer-to-peer exchanges of information between farmers. The chief goal being to develop locally adapted solutions for peasant farmers that work with the available resources.

The agroecological perspective invites us to embrace the complexity of nature and to see this complexity not as a liability, but as an asset. Farmers are discoverer: he or she proceeds experimentally, by trial and error, observing what consequences follow from which combinations, and learning from what works best in their local context. So-called ‘modern’ agriculture did the exact opposite. It sought to

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Posted By in Ethiopia AgroEcology Platform
Posted 26 July 2017 at 01:50

Agroecology: sustainable land use

“… The man begins to assert, as he learns to respect and understand the ground he walks on.” Atahualpa Yupanqui

It is common to consider soil as an inert, lifeless, made only for minerals. But hundreds of species of animals, plants, fungi and bacteria are found inhabiting soil and they play a very important role in the ecological and environmental balance.

The reality we seldom fail to see is desertification is progressing slowly. This process involves the degradation of environment in general and soil degradation in particular due to climate changes but mostly due to human activities. The problem with these degraded soils is a slow recovery and the great effort to reverse this situation.

The full article is found here:

Sarah Assefa Lovely! Please add the first part of the asserted quote! Nice link, I want to learn to better respect the ground that I walk on, the ground that feeds me!

4 months 1 week ago

Posted By in AgriProFocus Ethiopia
Posted 24 July 2017 at 09:03

Investments in small-scale sustainable agriculture

Why investing in small scale agriculture?

This report will aim to increase knowledge, awareness and discussions about investments in small-scale sustainable agriculture among farmers’ organization, NGOs, institutions and investors working in agriculture, especially in developing countries. Also provides facts about the current situation for the investments in and support for small-scale sustainable agriculture.

Most of about 800 million people suffering from hunger and extreme poverty are peasants and their families. An estimated 2 billion of the world’s poorest people live in households in developing countries and depend on agriculture in some form for their livelihoods. Small-scale food producers – farmers  – provide  the food to the majority of the world population. They also constitute the largest group of “economic active people”. Small-scale farmers are facing many challenges, not only financial resources and

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