pest

Posted By in AgriProFocus Netherlands
Posted 5 September 2018 at 08:43

E-conference : Responding to Fall Armyworm in Africa

22-26 October. Free online participation

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/responding-to-fall-armyworm-in-africa-e-conference-registration-47116199822

Two years ago, fall armyworm (FAW) arrived in Africa. What we have learned so far? What are effective strategies in reaching farmers across the continent? How effective have responses so far been? What are the long-term consequences of these responses? What innovative ideas might work better?

Find out and share your insights during our carbon-free e-conference on responding to the fall armyworm outbreak in Africa, from 22-26 October. Subscribe here to join daily sessions on various aspects of responding to the FAW outbreak in Africa and access an online platform to meet, share work and discuss with others. The e-conference and the online platform will result in a shared action agenda that everyone can contribute to.

Program summary, daily sessions from 13:00-14:30 GMT:

  • 22 October: Fall armyworm identifi

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Nicole Metz Dear Mubarak Inuwa, Thanks for your reponse to the post on the Foodathon at WUR. Sorry to hear your application was rejected. All outcomes of the Foodathon can be viewed here: https://foodathon-solutionsmarket.com/ I don't think there were formal papers presented though. You could also follow the conference website of WUR for further reporting and papers (probably these will come in the coming weeks) https://www.wur.nl/en/Research-Results/Sustainable-development-goals/SDG-Conference-Towards-Zero-Hunger.htm. Or else send further questions to the organisers of the Foodathon: e-conference.sdg@wur.nl 

4 months 2 weeks ago

MUBARAK INUWA Thank alot:Nicole Metze for answering my email on foodathon e- conference.

4 months 2 weeks ago

MUBARAK INUWA Please,kindly  let me know whether you can connect me with WUR. Charlotte Schilt for the issuance of my recently MOOC. Feeding Hungry Planet fro April 17 2018 to June 2018 .She is Co-chair of Agric ecology department to Ken Giller.

4 months 2 weeks ago

Nicole Metz Please contact WUR directly. Contact information is available through the MOOC or else the WUR website. Kind regards

4 months 2 weeks ago

MUBARAK INUWA I tried before, to get in contact with WUR.Directly, but it became abortive.

4 months 5 days ago

Posted By in AgriProFocus Ethiopia
Posted 3 November 2017 at 12:17

Dr. Fentahun on Fall Armyworm (FAW) Control in Ethiopia

Agriculture Knowledge Learning Documentation and Policy (AKLDP) Project

26th October 2017

For the Agroecology platform's new Agroecological Weed and Pest Management Working Group, Dr Fentahun from AKLDP presented the overall situation related to the new pest, Fall Army worm (FAW). He also shared a technical brief focusing on the characteristics of the pest, agro-climatic conditions and agro-ecological consistency affecting FAW, and management options and on suggested action points for the FAW in the context of Ethiopia.

Fall Army worm has existed for more than 150 years in Central, Eastern and South America. It is able to attack up to 186 crop species from a wide variety of families. It reproduces quickly and is able to travel far and fast, adult moths flying up to 100 km/day. It was identified in Ethiopia in February 2017, and due to its quick reproductive nature and favorable environmental conditions, it has now present in 8

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Sarah Assefa With regard to Conservation Agriculture, the research has conflicting findings about maintaining crop residues on the soil in addressing FAW: some advocate clean cultivation as a means of controlling the pest, however other publications have findings that do not support this. There is no conclusive finding.

1 year 2 months ago

Posted By in Ethiopia AgroEcology Platform
Posted 21 September 2017 at 12:40

COTTON WITHOUT HIGHLY HAZARDOUS PESTICIDES

Ethiopian experiences in growing high quality, high yield cotton using Agroecological methods

Background

Cotton is grown by smallholder farmers and large commercial farms in Ethiopia’s southern Rift Valley. Production can be challenging as the crop is prone to attack by a wide variety of pests, especially African Boll-worm Helicoverpa Armigera and sucking pests like White flies and Aphids. Farmers have to manage these and other pests effectively to gain decent yield, profit from their cotton and most have relied on the use of synthetic pesticides for pest control. Cotton farms mainly use older Organophosphate, Organochlorine and Carbamate insecticides, many of which qualify as Highly Hazardous Pesticides (HHPs), including Endosulfan, Malathion, Carbosulfan, Dimethoate and Dicofol (Table 1). Endosulfan is a Persistent Organic Pollutant (POP) listed for global banning under the Stockholm Convention since 2011, yet remains widely in use by

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Posted By in AgriProFocus Ethiopia
Posted 1 August 2017 at 03:17

Researchers in Wolaita Sodo managed to eliminate the "stranger American" maize pest

Assistant Professor Dawit Dalga had been working on researching the pest, and he said the new chemical was tested on farmlands in 14 villages and proved successful. The pest is locally being called the "strange American pest" because it made its way into Africa from the Americas.

More on: 

Fana Broadcasting Corporate (Amharic)

Anadolu Agency

Picture: aa.com.tr

Posted By in AgriProFocus Zambia
Posted 19 July 2017 at 02:07

Fall army worm

CABI has produced an evidence note and further information on the army worm crisis.

http://www.invasive-species.org/Uploads/InvasiveSpecies/FAW-inception-report.pdf

- http://www.cabi.org/projects/controlling-invasive-species/fall-armyworm/

For more information, contact

Dr Janny Vos

Strategic Partnerships Director

CABI

Email: j.vos@cabi.org

Visit us at: www.cabi.org

Posted By in Horticulture in Zambia
Posted 25 June 2017 at 06:21

Army worm in your country?

The fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) is an insect-pest which causes major damage to more than 80 crop species, including economically important crops, such as maize, rice, sorghum, wheat, sugarcane, several other vegetable crops and cotton.

It was first officially reported in Nigeria in early 2016 and has been officially confirmed in 11 and suspected in at least 14 other African countries, as of April 2017. Read more here